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Double Finger Knitting Instructions for Children

Posted by Kyle Design on November 11, 2013

Shop Personalized Knitting Gifts

Directions for Advanced Finger Knitting with Two Yarns

knitting_slipknotLearn to finger knit with two or more colors. Double finger knitting is a variation of simple finger knitting that creates a wider, fuller finished product. It is still quite easy to learn making it a great craft for kids. It requires no tools except for your hands or possibly a pair of scissors, and the only supplies needed are two balls of yarn and your hands. This fun craft allows you to quickly make a beautiful belt, scarf, handbag strap or headband for yourself or as a gift. Here’s how to get started:

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begin_finger_knittingFingerknitting – Step 1: Casting On

Start with two balls of yarn. For texture and variation, use two different types of yarn. To get an idea what they will look like when knitted together, hold both yarns together and wrap around your hand a few times. (Note: You can also follow these same instructions using three or four yarns as well.) Line up the end of both yarns and holding loosely together make a slipknot and secure on thumb. With palm facing front, begin looping yarns from the back of the hand behind index finger around to palm side and back then move on to middle finger, ring and pinkie fingers.

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loop_over_fingersStep 2: Loop on Second Row

Loop yarns from the back of the hand behind index finger around to palm side and back, moving on to middle finger, ring and pinkie fingers.

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yarn_half_hitchStep 3: Create Second Set of Loops

Once you reach the pinkie, wrap yarns around pinkie twice and continue back across the fingers again until you have two sets of loops on each of the four fingers. Secure end of yarns on thumb with a simple half hitch loop.

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lift_yarns_overStep 4: Begin Knitting

To begin finger knitting, lift bottom set of loops on pinkie finger up and over top set if loops and pull to back side of finger. Continue with the other three fingers until there is a single set of loops on each. Note: On index finger, be sure to work with the set of loops closest to the thumb.

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poke_pencilStep 5: How to Remove Knitting

If you need to stop knitting temporarily, you can easily remove the knitting from the fingers by pushing a pencil, paintbrush or chopstick through the loops and then lifting them off. Just set knitting aside.

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save_knitting_laterStep 6: Take a Break

Set knitting aside until ready to start again. When ready to begin knitting again, simply slip your fingers back through each of the loops and remove pencil.

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finger_knitting_lengthStep 7: Adding Rows

Add another row of yarn, looping around each finger from the back around to the front until each finger again has two loops. At this point, the last loop is on the pinkie with the ball of yarn coming away from it. Knit as before, starting with the index finger and pulling bottom loops over top loops. Continue adding a row of the yarn set and knitting back and forth across the fingers until the desired length is achieved. Once you’ve knitted a few rows, it is safe to drop the starter loop of yarn being held on the thumb as knitting won’t unravel from that end.
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cut_yarn_long_tailStep 8: Casting Off

When you are finished knitting and are ready to cast off, cut or break yarn ends leaving about a 10″ long tail. Take the ends of the yarn and push these tails through the loops on each finger to prevent them from unraveling. It will then be safe to remove your fingers.

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tie_off_finger_knittingStep 9: Work In Tails

Tie a final knot at the last set of loops. Finish off each end of the knitting by taking the long end of yarn and working it back up through the knitting to hide, trimming off if necessary. Gently adjust tension and length, and avoid pulling too tightly unless you would like the knitting to come to a point (when planning to add puff ball).

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final_knotStep 10: Finishing Touches

An example of the finished length of double fingerknit yarn. To create a puffed ball end, cut 10 or 12 lengths of yarn (or more, depending on yarn bulk) about 6″ long. Tightly tie together in the center, and then tie onto end of scarf.

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Tips for Best Results at Finger Knitting

tip-kyle-design.jpgTip: Using Your Thumb Finger knitting can be done with or without the thumb, but using just index, middle, ring and pinkie fingers will create a narrower finished piece.

tip-kyle-design.jpgTip: Controlling the Tension If you keep your fingers close together, you will achieve a tighter knit. If you keep your fingers spread widely, it will recreate a more open knit. The thumb can be included in the pattern if you would like a wider finished product.

tip-kyle-design.jpgTip: Making a Wider Scarf To make a wider scarf, finger knit two or three sections of equal lengths, and then use a crochet hook or children’s large plastic embroidery needle to stitch together. If you alternate the colors you can create a striking striped pattern.

knitters_holidaysx2s_decorationsKnitting Christmas Ornament

Surprise someone who knits with a keepsake knitting ornament – personalize it with their favorite color and a custom engraving.

Or, check out Kyle Design’s line of unique gifts for knitters.

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..Personalized Gifts for Girls

 

 

 

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Posted in crafts, craftswomen, DIY Crafts, kids | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Purse Hook – Hot “Design Your Own” Handbag Accessory

Posted by Kyle Design on April 18, 2009

Purse Hooks are the latest hot accessory for women who carry handbags!

Purse Hooks are the latest hot accessory for women who carry handbags!

Familiar yet with handbag holders, those strong hooks that hang over the edge of a table or bar to keep purses close and germ-free? Here at Kyle Design we’ve added our own twist to these up-and-coming must-have accessories that are turning into the coolest new gift idea for women of style.

Unlike other sites that offer you a dozen or two popular images (purse, cat, flower, spiral, shoes, etc. – yes, we have those, too), Kyle Design offers over 400 patterns. Specialized designs include professions, sports, musical instruments, more unusual animals, monograms,  games, crafts, Chinese characters, alcoholic drinks, fruit, trees, desserts and so much more.

Better yet, you decide what color you want, you decide if you prefer silver or gold. Literally, you create the look, we create the purse hook. No need to have a generic handbag hanger, no fear of two women whipping out the same exact holder. And we’re fast. We typically ship within a day or two – even for custom items such as these designer handbag holders.

Do Comedy and Tragedy describe your dating experience? Then we've got just the purse hook for you!

Do Comedy and Tragedy describe your dating experience? Then we've got just the purse hook for you!

Choices, Choices: How many possibilities are there? Currently, 440 original designs x 2 metal choices x 19 gorgeous colors = over 16,000 possible looks! How many friends do you have on Facebook? How many of them carry handbags? More than 16,000? I think that the chances are pretty good that you won’t show up at a restaurant or bar with the same purse hanger.

Simple? Yes! They are so easy to use. Simply set handbag holder disc on the edge of table and hook on a purse strap. That’s it!

Interested in Safety? These purse hangers are perfect for holding designer handbags, shopping bags, digital camera, tote bag strap, umbrellas or backpacks where they stay clean, safe and convenient – right next to you at a table or bar. No more worries about forgetting a purse on the back of a chair, an umbrella on the floor, or being distracted and forgetting to keep an eye on your wallet.

We have great designs for professional women such as this purse hook for a pharmacist.

We have great designs for professional women such as this purse hook for a pharmacist.

Single? These designer handbag holders are great conversation starters, too! They provide a small window into your world that someone new could run with. Although popular in Europe for years, purse table hooks are new enough here in the U.S. that most people I run into are curious about them.

Support American Designers? California artist Kyle McKeown Mansfield creates all the fun designs and unique patterns found on every handbag caddy. You can be the designer when you design your own purse hook – we’ll make it for you right here in our art studio and promptly ship your personalized purse table hook to you in a velveteen pouch.

Show your creative side, have fun, express the real you! Select a purse hook design/color/metal grouping that is a true reflection of who you are! They make wonderful gifts for her including professional women, working girls, dating singles or the handbag queen.

Want to see more? Check out our full collection of Uniqe Purse Hanger Designs. We also have really cool gifts for professionals like pharmacists, attorneys, doctors, dentists, nurses, scientists, mathematicians and others.

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Posted in art, artist, Artistic Gifts, craftswomen, design, designer, Functional Art, Handbag Holder, Lifestyle, Online Shopping, Purse Hook, Shopping, Style, Travel, Unique Gifts, woman, women | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Farewell to Jewelry Maker, Painter, Artist Laurel Burch

Posted by Kyle Design on September 23, 2007

I want to comment on San Francisco Bay Area artist, painter and jeweler Laurel Burch who died September 13 at the age of 61 from osteopetrosis, a rare congenital bone disease.

When I saw her obituary in the paper today, I actually cried out and my daughter asked, “What’s wrong, Mom?” In the mid 80’s, when I was producing my hand-painted silk jewelry line, she was a huge company and a source of inspiration for me.

Laurel Burch was known for her colorful cloisonné jewelry and especially her cat designs. She also designed coffee cups, tote bags, blankets, pillows and many, many other gift items in an updated folk art or tribal style. Her work was ubiquitous and a constant reminder to keep at it, keep designing, don’t give up.

I went to a lecture she gave at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco in the early 1990s and came away with a renewed sense of passion and creativity. She approached me after the lecture to compliment me on the colors of my outfit – the highest praise, coming from her. I was on cloud nine!

I started my business 25 years ago this month while a senior at U.C. Berkeley and IKyle Design Hand-Painted Silk Earrings of Cats assure you, those early years were tough. Eighty hour weeks, no money for anything, not even a haircut or the dentist. Trying to find my way, develop a style and figure out what would sell. And keep my spirits up. Certainly, my style has evolved over the years, but simply put, I guess I would describe my look is contemporary, colorful and detailed – here are my cat earrings made of hand-painted silk in 23K gold-plated settings. Please visit my Unique Cat Gifts page to see other pieces.

Laurel Burch left her home in the San Fernando Valley at 14, moved to San Francisco at 20 and began making jewelry from unusual things – bones, coins and beads – to support her baby daughter. The disease she battled from birth caused her bones to break very easily and caused pain and fatigue. Despite all this, she still managed to build a multi-million dollar business in what was traditionally a man’s world because of her passion and skills as as artist.

Cat Ornament for Christmas HolidayAfter listening to the challenges Laurel Burch faced her whole life, I could put it all in perspective and know that this was only a challenge to see how committed I was to being an entrepreneur, to life as an artist. Being creative is something I have to do: I believe it is somehow part of my physical make-up. I have so many new products and ideas in the works – I’m always behind getting them up on the site. Check here to see what is new each week: What’s New at Kyle Design.

So here I am, twenty-five years and counting…. Thank you, Laurel Burch. I will miss you.

Posted in Cats, Christmas Ornaments, craftswomen, designer, entrepreneur, Unique Gifts | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Artist’s Spirit: Starting Out – Part 1 – Creativity

Posted by Kyle Design on March 21, 2007

So, you want to be an artist. How do you know you have what it takes to make a career of it? This is the first in a series about what it takes to survive by a woman who has so far managed to make a living as an artist for 25 years.

The Creative Spirit – You have to have the innate creative spirit. I have always wanted to be an artist, and I even have it in writing. Each year of school, my mother filled out my “About Me” page in a schoolbook that summarized each grade. When I was only 5, I said that I wanted to be an artist when I grew up. It was such a revelation to open that book thirty years later and read that! Aha! It WAS in my blood, part of my being. Growing up, my drawings were always different than the other kids’. Abstract, colorful, fanciful. So it is definitely a plus if you feel that creative spirit so strongly that you just have to let it out.

And that’s just it, this feeling of needing to express those creative feelings. If you have the urge to design, if you want to put your own individual stamp on a project, have opinions about a better, more attractive or visually interesting way of approaching something you have to do, then you have that creative spirit. This is a very good start.

Here’s my personal experience: I had lost sight of that creative desire in high school and college. I was a good student, studied hard, was accepted to U.C. Berkeley. While in high school, you take those career assessment tests and they tell you what you’d be good at, and without many life experiences, I thought, OK, I guess I could become an engineer. When I entered Cal, I changed my mind to business because I had been working for my parents and their business was fascinating to me. In my freshman and sophomore years, I began to have doubts that a straight-forward career in business was going to hold my attention. So I took weekend art classes, started experimenting with different crafts – painting silk, jewelry making, printing. By the time I graduated, I had decided not to interview for any of the job postings in the Business School career center. “What do you mean, you’re not interviewing for any jobs?!?!?,” my friends cried. The creative spirit was stronger than my desire for money or stability.

Posted in artist, craftswomen, Creativity, designer, woman | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Still At It After 25 Years

Posted by Kyle Design on March 9, 2007

Well, I’m still at it. I’m an artist, a designer, a craftswoman, an entrepreneur, a boss, a small business owner, a webmaster, copywriter and even a product photographer. And still loving what I do even after 25 years.

I’m never quite sure what to say when the subject comes up of what I do for a living. Which phrase do I pick? How do I condense it all into a couple of words that would really encompass everything that I do? Each time I blurt one out, it doesn’t feel quite right, not a fully accurate representation.

I’ll let you know if and when I come up with a good way of phrasing it. What do others in a similar situation do? Can anyone out there can recommend a title? Please let me know what you’ve come up with.

So I’ll try: I’m an craftswoman working in mixed media who designs contemporary handmade gifts that I sell through a website as well as through galleries around the country. Whew!! A picture is worth a thousand words, so if you want to see exactly what (and how much!) I do, please visit my site at Kyle Design.

But I’m a wife and a mom, too. My family is involved with a new charter school in our community. I’m watching my weight and my cholesterol, trying to exercise more, monitoring my stress levels and trying to control my chocolate intake. The usual – just trying to juggle it all, not be a bad mommy while still finding time to laugh with my husband.

So I plan to muse on what being a woman artist has been like for 25 years, trying to do it all and feel like I’m not doing a half bad job at it. Sharing some of the tips and tricks I’ve learned along the way. The ups and downs and sideways of life and work.Dragonfly Business Card Holder

Posted in craftswomen, entrepreneur, mom, professional artist, woman | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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